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How to cook a whole cow

by inSing.com Editor

inSing.com - 14 August 2013 2:30 PM | Updated 15 Aug 2013

How to cook a whole cow

Keyaki's Wagyu Kaiseki set A

Pan Pacific Singapore hotel has brought in a whole Omi wagyu cow this month to serve at restaurants Edge, Hai Tien Lo and Keyaki located within the hotel. Each restaurant will be using different cuts from the cow in their own special Omi wagyu set menus and a la carte menus that are available from now to 31 August 2013.

We were curious to find out which cuts were suitable for which of our favourite dishes (and thus allocated to which restaurants), so we went behind the scenes. We also got tips straight from the Japanese butcher, so you can also try cooking specific cuts at home.

Imported from the Daikichi Ranch in the Shiga Prefecture in Japan, the grade A5 – the highest grade – Omi wagyu beef comes from grain-fed 30-month-old cattle that holds meat with fine marbling and high fat content. Here is a quick guide on which cuts to use for the different methods of cooking.

If you feel like letting the experts do the work, read on below for a teaser of the Omi wagyu beef items that the restaurant chefs at Pan Pacific are serving.

how to cook beef

Slow Roasted Wagyu Rump with Red Wine Sauce with Chapel Hill
Slow-roasted wagyu rump with red wine sauce at Edge.

At Keyaki (Address: Level 4, Pan Pacific Singapore, 7 Raffles Boulevard | Tel: 68268240), three traditional seven-course Omi wagyu kaiseki sets ($175.50 per person) showcase the beef in all forms: from wagyu salad and steamed wagyu beef on rice to seared wagyu sushi. A la carte dishes include grilled wagyu beef with sansho peppers ($60), wagyu sirloin teppanyaki (150g, $90) and wagyu sashimi ($45).

For dinner on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, eat all the Omi wagyu beef you can at Edge (Address: Level 3, Pan Pacific Singapore | Tel: 68268240): $103 per person lets you have slow-roasted wagyu rump with red wine sauce, stir-fried wagyu top round with ginger and spring onions, and barbecued wagyu shoulder.

So that there is as little meat wastage as possible, Hai Tien Lo (Address: Level 37, Pan Pacific Singapore | Tel: 68268240) takes the cuts more suitable for stews and grilling, as well as the off-cuts. A la carte dishes (from $40) on the menu include braised wagyu beef brisket and rice flour rolls served in claypot ($48), steamed diced wagyu beef tendon balls with glutinous rice and truffle ($45), and the chilled marinated sliced wagyu beef tendon with jellyfish in spicy chilli sauce ($45).

*Individual dish prices have been listed without GST and service charge.

All prices are subject to GST and service charge.