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Beach Road Scissors Cut Curry Rice

AsianChineseHainanese
Located in Jalan Besar, Beach Road Scissors Cut Curry Rice specialises in Hainanese curry mixed rice.

Daily: 11:00 - 03:30

+65 98261464
$4 based on 28 submissions
Lunch (5 votes), Supper (5 votes), Dinner (4 votes)
theyummyyak

Ugly but delicious.

For complete review and pictures, please click here.

Food doesn't have to look good to taste good. This is particularly true of scissor-cut curry rice, which has to be one of the sloppiest looking dishes ever, but also happens to be one of my favourite foods. This dish has both Hainanese and colonial origins, as most cooks who worked for wealthy British families back in the early 1900s were Hainanese, and put an inventive twist on the pork cutlet by pummeling it flat, snipping it up over rice and coating it with curry.   My order the first time round comprised a fried pork cutlet blackened with gravy, a ngoh hiang (five spice pork roll), chup chye (stewed cabbage) and a fried egg. They're cut into bite-sized pieces with a pair of metal scissors, following which gravy from the lor bak (stewed pork) and then curry is ladled over, which renders the individual components of the dish quite unidentifiable.   The layering of the lor bak gravy and curry create a hybrid gravy that's... magic. It's only slightly spicy and possesses a starchy texture, which works as its meant to be drizzled over plain rice. It was the gravy which elevated the individual ingredients from okay to amazing. Honestly I found the ngoh hiang soggy and the blackened pork cutlet to be on the wrong side of salty. Also tried a bit of the lor bak and found it too tough. A fried egg isn't too hard to do, but the chup chye was great. Soft, sweet and distinctly shrimpy. Nothing goes better with curry than perfectly stewed chup chye.   I returned a couple weeks ago and we ordered dishes to share. The only new dish I had was the chicken chop, which was freaking awesome. The sesame seeds it was coated with made it super fragrant and it was snipped into itty bits which made it so moreish with the curry. I declare my second visit a complete win.   In short, stick with the fried egg, chup chye and chicken chop.

The HGW community like this place for...

  • curry chicken3 votes
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Based on 28 votes
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The chicken chop is not to be missed.
19 Nov 2013 • 21 reviews • 0 follower

Ugly but delicious.

For complete review and pictures, please click here.

Food doesn't have to look good to taste good. This is particularly true of scissor-cut curry rice, which has to be one of the sloppiest looking dishes ever, but also happens to be one of my favourite foods. This dish has both Hainanese and colonial origins, as most cooks who worked for wealthy British families back in the early 1900s were Hainanese, and put an inventive twist on the pork cutlet by pummeling it flat, snipping it up over rice and coating it with curry.   My order the first time round comprised a fried pork cutlet blackened with gravy, a ngoh hiang (five spice pork roll), chup chye (stewed cabbage) and a fried egg. They're cut into bite-sized pieces with a pair of metal scissors, following which gravy from the lor bak (stewed pork) and then curry is ladled over, which renders the individual components of the dish quite unidentifiable.   The layering of the lor bak gravy and curry create a hybrid gravy that's... magic. It's only slightly spicy and possesses a starchy texture, which works as its meant to be drizzled over plain rice. It was the gravy which elevated the individual ingredients from okay to amazing. Honestly I found the ngoh hiang soggy and the blackened pork cutlet to be on the wrong side of salty. Also tried a bit of the lor bak and found it too tough. A fried egg isn't too hard to do, but the chup chye was great. Soft, sweet and distinctly shrimpy. Nothing goes better with curry than perfectly stewed chup chye.   I returned a couple weeks ago and we ordered dishes to share. The only new dish I had was the chicken chop, which was freaking awesome. The sesame seeds it was coated with made it super fragrant and it was snipped into itty bits which made it so moreish with the curry. I declare my second visit a complete win.   In short, stick with the fried egg, chup chye and chicken chop.
25 Oct 2013 • 296 reviews • 14 followers

Cheap Eats

A plate of pork belly rice for under $2.50? It exists. We ordered the smallest portion of plain rice (available at $0.50, $0.70 or $1), asked for the tau pok (beancurd, $0.50) and the pork belly ($1.40), and still walked out quite full. The servers gave two sauces – the starchy, slightly spicy curry sauce, and the mildly herbal dark sauce in which the tau pok was steeping. What a good, quick, flavourful meal. For more $2.50 eats reviews, read here http://www.hungrygowhere.com/gallery/what-to-eat-for-2-50-and-under--*gid-232e3101/photos/?oauth_token=e09721797fbc62a82b6b00259a58552d&oauth_verifier=0c3be169759169884775351860bee1ad#cb240800
19 Aug 2013 • 90 reviews • 1 follower

Probably the best curry rice in Singapore

It doesn't have a fanciful shop front but one thing you'd always see is a queue. No matter what time you go it'd always have a queue. Fear not, the queue usually moves very quickly so even if just a short wait of 15 minutes, I'm telling you it's definitely worth it. For full review with picture of dishes, click here on the link. http://pepperminter.blogspot.sg/2013/08/scissor-cut-scissor-curry-rice-jalan.html 

02 May 2013 • 408 reviews • 13 followers

Hainanese curry rice

No matter day or night there had always been diners tucking into plates of Hainanese-style gravy-laden rice. After walking by this coffeeshop a few times we finally popped in to have a try.

The stall offers a wide array of accompaniments, ranging from deep-fried and braised meats, eggs to vegetables. Almost all the dishes came doused in braising sauce or curry sauce, or both. Even the chili sauce wasn’t spared a tiny scoop of curry sauce.

The obligatory pork chop was rather thin to begin with, and it’s further snipped into bite-size pieces (by a pair of scissors of course). The meat was sufficiently tender though the batter had turned soggy and flat. There’s none of the crispness that we were longing for.

On the other hand, the braised pork belly was delish. Not too fatty and the meat was well flavored with hints of aromatic spices.

We also had stewed cabbage. It’s cooked till very soft so the veggie soaked up the sauces really well.

At ten-ish when the food had already been left standing for several hours, it’s probably wise to lay off the deep-fried stuff. This gooey mess of a meal looked slightly off-putting but it would’ve been more delectable if at least the sauces were warm. Our dinner was lacklustre simply because it’s a cold one.

Total damage: $10.80 nett
21 Feb 2013 • 37 reviews • 0 follower

Beach Road Scissor-Cut Curry Rice, the rice with a disguise.

Alright, let’s go straight to the food. Besides the rice and the curry, you have a variety of side dishes, such as chicken wing, fried egg and ngoh hiang to choose from. But one of the most popular add-ons would be the fried chicken cutlet. So after the side dishes have been furiously cut into pieces by a snappy scissors, 3 different sauces are poured over the plate. So what do you get at the end? A plate of aw-curry-some. The 3 different sauces work so well together to give a slightly curry-spicy, milky and sweet taste to complement the steaming hot rice and side dishes. My friend and I finished the plate in around 5 minutes. We were either super hungry or it was that good. Wait, make that both.

Please visit http://whattoeatah.wordpress.com/2012/10/26/beach-road-scissor-cut-curry-rice-the-rice-with-a-disguise/ for the complete review and uploaded photos.