Search Restaurant

Reviews

Back to Blanco Court Prawn Mee#01-01, 243 Beach Road
91%100%22
Overall Rating
Food/Drink
Ambience
Value
Service
Price Range

$8/pax

based on 12 reviews
Suitable For
Lunch6 votes
Cheap Eat/Budget4 votes
Vibrant/Noisy3 votes
0 / 3000 charactersLogin

What others are saying...

terentsu
 • 27 Apr 2014 3 reviews 0 follower
Overall
Food/Drink
Ambience
Value
Service
Stock is just nice. Prawns fresh, but only given 3 halves. Tail is nice. Ribs abit overcooked. Noodles alright. Settled for $10.80 a bowl cos they said smaller prawn soldout. Come early before lunch hours. Many tables but taken up fast.
Read MoreHide

I spent $11 per person.

I added 1 photo

0 people found this review helpful

Was it helpful to you? Yes

Weekend Eat What
 • 17 Nov 2013 31 reviews 0 follower
Overall
Food/Drink
Ambience
Value
Service
For full review, please visit http://weekendeatwhatsg.blogspot.sg/2013/11/blanco-court-prawn-mee.html

Have you ever eaten a bowl of perfect prawn mee? I found the perfect prawn mee at Blanco Court Prawn Mee. 

Choose from a hearty bowl of jumbo prawn noodles ($8/$10) which had bigger tiger prawns, or the smaller prawns (with or without ribs) version that cost half the price ($4.50/$5.50). For those who are repulsive towards peeling the prawns with bare hands, Blanco Court is considerate enough to half the prawns so that it is easier to extract that fresh sweet meat from the shell. Without using the hands of course.

We could not stop hankering for the broth, the most important component of any prawn soup. The broth packed a robust punch with bursting umami-packed flavors and the briny sweetness of the crustaceans. The fried shallots in the soup were infused to entice the taste buds. The best part? Free refills.

Somehow, it has become a non-obligatory yet mandatory thing to order some Ngoh hiang from the neighboring stall. Can't help it because the deep fried Ngoh Hiang was a savory and addictive appetizer to the prawn mee feast. The prawn crackers and fritters didn't leave much impression though.
Read MoreHide
I added 2 photos

0 people found this review helpful

Was it helpful to you? Yes

make your calories count
 • 09 Jun 2013 132 reviews 0 follower
Overall
Food/Drink
Ambience
Value
Service
For full review: http://makeyourcaloriescount.blogspot.sg/2013/06/sg-blanco-court-prawn-mee-beach-road.html

Having moved from Xiamen to Singapore, this humble looking eatery had been serving its customers since 1928. This has been a place that I visit since young, probably due to the influence of my parents who are regular patrons and swear by the jumbo wild tiger prawns which seemingly nowhere else in Singapore seems to serve! My mum would even jokingly remarked 'dua chiak, ho chiak!' which in Hokkien meant big and tasty!


The traditional rendition of prawn noodles from Xiamen is the classic version that is soup-based. However due to the need to cater to the needs of their Tibetan customers back then, the dry version was created, which reminded them of home. The latter version where dry chilli powder was added to the noodles was improvised with demand from Penang customers. Apparently, adding on chilli powder atop the broth is the Penang-style and one where its legacy continues!


For some reason, ngor hiang (sausage-esque roll filled with minced pork and prawn seasoned with 5 spices powder) had been a partnering appetizer to the prawn noodles here and seemed almost like a tradition to order it together with some classic guang chiang (pink pork sausage), crispy prawn crackers and yam fritters while waiting for the prawn noodles to be served. On this occasion, cursed with a small appetite, we decided to give this a miss and go straight to the mains!

Jumbo tiger prawn noodles (S$8/-)
At S$8, this was the smallest portion for the jumbo prawns category. For the normal smaller prawns, they would come at half the price for S$4. The jumbo prawns mostly came with prawn roe in each of them, so for the cholesterol conscious - beware! We are not exactly fans of prawn roe but the prawns were fresh and distinctly wild caught. The main difference is that burst of freshness in sea prawns which would not have that slightly stale taste like its freshwater counterparts. The prawns were thoughtfully sliced into halves for the lazy diners who would not have to get their hands dirty and messy with the de-shelling. The flesh of the prawns was succulent and bouncy. Topped with fried shallot and lard pieces, it gave an added layer of crispy crunchy texture to the soft al dente thick mee hoon (rice vermicelli) and that beautiful fragrance. While the greens were lacking in the bowl, it was compensated by the unami flavours of the broth, which had an initial taste of savouriness but concluded with a tinge of sweetness at the back of throat upon savouring. It might disappoint some if you are looking for a really strong oomph of the prawn flavours in the broth but do not get me wrong, it was pleasing to our palate, but just a heads up if you were looking for a more intense flavour. While the flavours of the dish and the freshness of the ingredients were spot-on, we felt that it was slightly overpriced at S$8 because what you are really getting is just two jumbo prawns.
Read MoreHide

Must tries: Jumbo tiger prawn noodles

I added 2 photos
  • Jumbo tiger prawn noodles (S$8/-)
  • Jumbo tiger prawn noodles (S$8/-)

0 people found this review helpful

Was it helpful to you? Yes