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Dajie Niang Dou Fu

3.7

Eatability rating

3 reviews

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AsianChineseHalal
Dajie Niang Dou Fu offers different styles of niang dou fu, namely Hakka, Ampang, Tom Yam, Laksa, Black Bean Chili Sauces, and Soya Bean Soup. To accompany your soup, they also offer a wide variety of of ingredients to choose from. What's more, they're Halal certified!

Daily: 10.00am - 10.00pm

+65 67742030
$5 based on 9 submissions
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When my very large bowl of beef noodle soup arrived, I was struck at first by the beautiful fragrant aroma of the fresh coriander and spring onions, which were sprinkled liberally on the top. It almost reminded me of a pho, the Vietnamese beef noodle soup. The almost paper thin slices of beef were floating tantalisingly on the surface, and the snow white hand pulled noodles were hiding just below. The first thing I did was the pick up a spoon and taste the beautiful clear broth, and it had a clean beef flavour with a hint of sweetness, and my whole mouth and nose filled with the fragrance of the fresh herbs. The noodles had the perfect level of firmness and chewiness, which despite the overly generous portion, were so delicious that I just had to fish out every last noodle from the bottom of the bowl! A simple meal, but oh so satisfying. This was pretty much a perfect bowl of noodle soup, save for beef slices, which were a tad on the dry side. If they could have served the sliced beef raw, this would have been my idea of heaven in a bowl. And at a mere $9.80 for a massive serving, you could not get better value anywhere else in Sydney.

The HGW community like this place for...

  • Hakka yong tau foo1 vote
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Latest Community Reviews:
• 17 Jun 2012 • 6 reviews • 0 follower

Nice unpretentious Yong Tau Fu

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There are a lot of variety of food you can choose from.

Niang Dou Fu or Yong tau fu literally means stuffed bean curd. These bean curd are usually stuffed with fish paste steam and boiled in soups, usually eaten with noodles or even rice.

Here you can choose the many different version instead of the more common clear stock made of anchovies or ikan bilis.

The have Ampang, Hakka, Normal clear soup, laksa and black bean sauce.

I'd normally go for Ampang as it is thicker sweeter and generally they deep fried everything you choose which is uncommon in normal Yong Tau Foo.

Read more of the review on my blog here or go to www.eatingcorner.com

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• 20 Dec 2011 • 259 reviews • 7 followers

yum yum niang dou fu!

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For photos and more reviews, visit us at http://foodphd.wordpress.com!

We were craving for 酿豆腐 one evening and managed to find Da Jie Niang Dou Fu 大姐酿豆腐. Da Jie Niang Dou Fu 大姐酿豆腐 occupies a shop space on its own and besides 酿豆腐, it sells other common Chinese 煮炒 dishes. Besides the conventional soup 酿豆腐, Da Jie Niang Dou Fu 大姐酿豆腐 offers 6 different styles – Hakka, Laksa, Tom Yam, Ampang, Black Bean Sauce and Tomato Ketchup.

The spread of food choices was rather wide, perhaps even more comprehensive than those at hawker centres/coffee shops. We went for the Ampang and the conventional soup 酿豆腐. The Ampang sauce wasn’t any special, it tasted more of like some chicken gravy/stew used in other Chinese dishes. The food items were pretty fresh. What impressed and delighted us most was the chili sauce! The chili sauce was very different from other 酿豆腐 stalls. In fact, this chili is one of its kind. It had this very zangy, slightly sour, and spicy kick. It wasn’t rich in sambal or dried prawns, but somewhat exuded a mild turmeric taste.

The minimum order was 5 pieces ($3) and noodles/rice cost another $0.60.

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• 17 Jan 2010 • 3 reviews • 0 follower

Healthy halal food!

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At last, we have an affordable and tasty dining option that's open late and not MSG laden. Plus, it's halal too! Dajie is your usual yong tau foo shop - you pick the ingredients you want, tell the lady what style you want (soup, hakka, tom yam, ampang, laksa etc.) and they bring it to you a few minutes later, hot and with the yummy sambal.

All this plus a drink for about $5 - who could ask for more? The ladies who work there are nice and friendly (just give them a smile) and people who discover this place tend to keep coming back several times within the first few weeks of discovery.

Since it's not where the MRT is, parking is never a problem.

And if you don't feel like yong tau foo, they sell all manner of Chinese food (also halal) like one-dish noodles, thai-style tofu, you tiao etc (ok so that stuff's not so healthy...but still so yummy!)

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