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62%100%18 votes

Good Chance Popiah Eating House (Silat Ave)

2.3

Eatability rating

12 reviews

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AsianChineseFujianHokkien

Located at Silat Ave, Good Chance specializes in serving wide variety of po piah.

Tue - Sun: 11:00 - 14:30

Tue - Sun: 18:00 - 21:30

Closed: Mon

+65 62710698
$20 based on 18 submissions
Children/Family (5 votes), Dinner (5 votes), Lunch (4 votes)
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D-I-Y Popiah Lunch @ Good Chance (好彩) Popiah on 25Jul2014

See my full reviews & photos at = http://chefquak.com/2014/07/25/d-i-y-popiah-lunch-good-chance-好彩-popiah-on-25jul2014/

a friend bought 7pax lunch at good chance (好彩) popiah on 25.7.2014. :-) good chance started operations in 1977 and is now managed by its 3rd generation. according to a server they moved to the silat avenue premises about 8 years ago? the friend who bought lunch said they only accept reservations of 6pax minimum. strange rule? but i not complaining since i got invited as the lucky 5th of 6th person…haha. lol. :-the d-i-y popiah dish was served in multiples of 6 (i.e. 6, 12, 18). anyhow most reviewers including soshiok mentioned that the fillings were more than enough & one should just add the skin, which was what we did. in the end i took 3 helpings.  the fillings were the usual ban kwang (turnips) and carrots, the ingredients/condiments included the usual garlic soil, chilli, lettuce, tao gay (bean sprouts), shredded omelette, chopped peanuts, sweet sauce. skin was thin & quite good, the fillings were just average & i though somewhat not as tasty as usual popiahs i had, which was like very rarely. several of us were missing the prawns & lap cheong. for me i also missed the hae kor (prawn paste) which we used to have when my wife or her friends had popiah parties when my children were very small. most of my friends though did not have hae kor for their popiahs. there was some techniques in folding the popiah as some friends tried to educate me. that reminded me in the early years i could actually fold a thinner long popiah & actually cut them into 5 pieces etc as some hawker stalls served them. now though it mattered not as i was eating the whole piece..haha.  the yam fish head soup was pretty good, though it would not really compare with having a yam fish head steamboat, and a glance at the prices suggested it was not cheaper either. most commented that the hae chor ingredients were too smooth & not chunky enough. one friend said the hae chor at lee do was much better. not that i remember much, but hae chor at lee do, yuan xing, chui huay lim, lee kui (ah hoi) etc all tasted about same to me. i do agree these ones here seemed not as tasty. also they looked quite different from the nice hae chor at chui huay lim and yuan xing (appetiser platter).  the kong ba pao was i guess also competent. the braised yam was a good addition to the belly pork. otherwise the dish did not taste any special to me. my memory of westlake kongbabao (which i had not been for maybe 15years) seem better than this, and the ones a friend packet for me some months ago were certainly better.  i think my own braised belly pork or the ones at kuay chap stalls would also be tastier & better textured than this. overall, it was a usual zi char place with an aircon environment. the prices also looked like usual zi char places. i supposed the d-i-y popiah was a welcome variation & added attraction for the place.

The HGW community like this place for...

  • Popiah6 votes
  • fried mee suah3 votes
  • sambal fried fish2 votes
  • sambal prawns1 vote
  • yam fish head soup1 vote
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Latest Community Reviews:
• 25 Jul 2014 • 270 reviews • 1 follower

D-I-Y Popiah Lunch @ Good Chance (好彩) Popiah on 25Jul2014

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See my full reviews & photos at = http://chefquak.com/2014/07/25/d-i-y-popiah-lunch-good-chance-好彩-popiah-on-25jul2014/

a friend bought 7pax lunch at good chance (好彩) popiah on 25.7.2014. :-) good chance started operations in 1977 and is now managed by its 3rd generation. according to a server they moved to the silat avenue premises about 8 years ago? the friend who bought lunch said they only accept reservations of 6pax minimum. strange rule? but i not complaining since i got invited as the lucky 5th of 6th person…haha. lol. :-the d-i-y popiah dish was served in multiples of 6 (i.e. 6, 12, 18). anyhow most reviewers including soshiok mentioned that the fillings were more than enough & one should just add the skin, which was what we did. in the end i took 3 helpings.  the fillings were the usual ban kwang (turnips) and carrots, the ingredients/condiments included the usual garlic soil, chilli, lettuce, tao gay (bean sprouts), shredded omelette, chopped peanuts, sweet sauce. skin was thin & quite good, the fillings were just average & i though somewhat not as tasty as usual popiahs i had, which was like very rarely. several of us were missing the prawns & lap cheong. for me i also missed the hae kor (prawn paste) which we used to have when my wife or her friends had popiah parties when my children were very small. most of my friends though did not have hae kor for their popiahs. there was some techniques in folding the popiah as some friends tried to educate me. that reminded me in the early years i could actually fold a thinner long popiah & actually cut them into 5 pieces etc as some hawker stalls served them. now though it mattered not as i was eating the whole piece..haha.  the yam fish head soup was pretty good, though it would not really compare with having a yam fish head steamboat, and a glance at the prices suggested it was not cheaper either. most commented that the hae chor ingredients were too smooth & not chunky enough. one friend said the hae chor at lee do was much better. not that i remember much, but hae chor at lee do, yuan xing, chui huay lim, lee kui (ah hoi) etc all tasted about same to me. i do agree these ones here seemed not as tasty. also they looked quite different from the nice hae chor at chui huay lim and yuan xing (appetiser platter).  the kong ba pao was i guess also competent. the braised yam was a good addition to the belly pork. otherwise the dish did not taste any special to me. my memory of westlake kongbabao (which i had not been for maybe 15years) seem better than this, and the ones a friend packet for me some months ago were certainly better.  i think my own braised belly pork or the ones at kuay chap stalls would also be tastier & better textured than this. overall, it was a usual zi char place with an aircon environment. the prices also looked like usual zi char places. i supposed the d-i-y popiah was a welcome variation & added attraction for the place.
Overall
Food/Drink
Value
Ambience
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• 07 Mar 2014 • 3 reviews • 0 follower

simple restaurant but Food is Nice!

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The outlook/setting of the restaurant is not nice since it is in a HDB area but the food is definitely nice!

DIY Popiah definitely tastes much better than anywhere..I tried the Yam Fish head soup & the sambal prawns as well. Both dishes were fresh and taste yummy. Will still bring my parents to patronise the restaurant again.
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• 19 Feb 2014 • 261 reviews • 8 followers

Classics Done Well

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Visit http://dairycream.blogspot.jp/2014/02/good-chance-popiah-delicious-hokkien.html for full post and pics
This Hokkien restaurant has been around for more than 30 years and one of the famous dish that appears on every single table is the Popiah. What could be more fun that making our own popiah from the piping hot claypot that is served within five minutes after the table is laid with all the other ingredients. 

Optional condiments like the sweet Chinese sausages can be ordered starting at $4 for a small plate.

Priced at $18 for 6 skins, the pot provides more than enough fillings unless you stuffed each of the skin to its maximum. We had no problem  finishing this pot just by itself because the julienned bang kwang topped with mini dried prawns were juicy and fragrant. 

The popiah skin is resilient enough to withstand the excess moisture, though we encountered several failed attempts to transport our masterpieces into our mouth without breaking the skin.

The stir-fried baby kalian ($10) that boasts a vibrant fresh shade of green, are crunchy yet permeated with the breath of wok hei. 

The stewed pork is yet another rich and delicious braised dish that comes with the standard white buns ($16). The bonus slices of yam escaped the humdrum of a typical stew pork bun that is stuffed only with lettuce leaf. 

The Fish Head and Yam soup ($16 for small) did not look inviting but received praises from the tables for its wholesome flavours. The slurry broth is furnished with subtle sweetness from the napa cabbage and yam. And the deep-fried slices of fish were meaty and delivered comforting aroma that would be impossible if they had not brush encounter with bubbling oil. 

But the star of the night is none other than the Pig Trotters Bee Hoon ($14 for small). One can relish in the homemade goodness of this dish that is moist but not too wet. Napa cabbage, mushrooms, bean sprouts, bits of eggs and crunchy shrimps bolster the flavours of this dish. Everyone was obsessed with this dish despite being stuffed to the brim with the earlier dishes.

This is a reliable restaurant that you can count on for some wonderful heritage dishes. Just remember to place a reservation in advance especially during weekends if you do not wish to join in the queue.
Visit http://dairycream.blogspot.jp for more
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