HungryGoWhere Singapore Food Guide, Restaurants, Eating Guide and Reviews - HGW
Search the site
0%84%100%6 votes

Malaysian Food Street

3.2

Eatability rating

4 reviews

Write a review
AsianChineseHainaneseHokkienIndianMalay
The new Malaysian Street Food next to Universal Studios Singapore will feature 17 of Malaysia's top hawker stalls that are hand-picked by chefs from Resorts World Sentosa and native Malaysians.Notable stalls include the famous Huen Kee Claypot Chicken Rice from Kuala Lumpur and Penang Lim Brothers’ Char Koay Teow.

Mon - Thu: 11:00 - 22:00

Fri - Sat: 09:00 - 00:00

Sun: 09:00 - 22:00

$13 based on 6 submissions
Share on
4

Malaysian Food Street @ Resort World Sentosa – Lured from across the causeway

The Glutton Family loves Malaysian food – from Penang Fried Kway Teow, Klang Bak Kut Teh, Malacca Chicken Rice, Prawn Noodle to the sumptuous desserts; we’re already drooling at the thought!   Now, you don’t even need to go up North for good Malaysian food: just head south to Sentosa to enjoy all the famous and delectable food from Penang, KL to Malacca – at the Malaysia Food Street @ Resorts World Sentosa.   Must try their Claypot rice, Penang Fried Kway Teow, Prawn Noodle and Penang Laksa!   Please refer to www.ieatandeat.com for details review.

The HGW community like this place for...

  • char kway teow2 votes
  • claypot chicken rice2 votes
  • Hokkien Mee1 vote
  • Penang Laksa1 vote
  • Prawn noodle1 vote
Community submitted Favourites:
Overall
Based on 4 reviews
Food/Drink
Value
Ambience
Service
Food
Coffee
Drinks
Services
Ambience
Value
Quality
Location

Similar Listings

54%
275 Votes
2.9

149 reviews

Todai

Asian • Fusion
Have something to say? Write a review.
Overall
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A

Delete Photo

Are you sure you want to delete this photo?

Latest Community Reviews:
• 13 Sep 2014 • 131 reviews • 0 follower

Malaysian Food Street @ Resort World Sentosa – Lured from across the causeway

Overall
Food
Coffee
Drinks
Services
Ambience
Value
Quality
Location
The Glutton Family loves Malaysian food – from Penang Fried Kway Teow, Klang Bak Kut Teh, Malacca Chicken Rice, Prawn Noodle to the sumptuous desserts; we’re already drooling at the thought!   Now, you don’t even need to go up North for good Malaysian food: just head south to Sentosa to enjoy all the famous and delectable food from Penang, KL to Malacca – at the Malaysia Food Street @ Resorts World Sentosa.   Must try their Claypot rice, Penang Fried Kway Teow, Prawn Noodle and Penang Laksa!   Please refer to www.ieatandeat.com for details review.
Overall
Food/Drink
Value
Ambience
Service
  • Penang Fried Kway Teow
• 09 Aug 2014 • 22 reviews • 1 follower

Yummy Char Koay Teow but Claypot Chicken Rice Disappointing

Overall
Food
Coffee
Drinks
Services
Ambience
Value
Quality
Location
The Char Koay Teow Stall was fantastic. Due to the queue, we all has numbers as the cook fried to order and we picked up when our numbers are flashed. Char Koay Teow was cleanly fried, not too oily and really hot after it was cooked.
However the Huen Kee Claypot Chicken Rice was disappointing. We had very skinny pieces of chicken with lots of bones and extremely burnt rice that we cannot even salvage. Do not overcook the claypot!
Overall
Food/Drink
Value
Ambience
Service
• 19 Jul 2014 • 147 reviews • 8 followers

Chaotic, long queues, pricy but yummy

Overall
Food
Coffee
Drinks
Services
Ambience
Value
Quality
Location
For pictures and full review, pls visit:
http://madamechewy.com/2014/07/19/malaysian-food-street/

We were craving for hawker food (MIL was yearning for Penang Laksa) and wanted somewhere comfortable (ie air-conditoned) to have our family weekend dinner. Having heard good things about Malaysian Food Street, we decided to check it out. 

Located at Resorts World Sentosa, this one stop dining destination houses some of Malaysia’s exceptional and famous hawker fare. Step inside you’ll feel like you’ve went back in time.

It was very crowded when we arrived on a Saturday evening. We were ravenous after a terribly long wait for a table and split up queue at different stores immediately. There were A LOT of choices. Ahhh, decisions, decisions…. This is my first time trying Lor Bak and totally fell in love with it. Penang Ah Long Lor Bak($8) meat is marinated with five spice powder from Penang, then rolled in soy bean sheets. Deep-frying brings an irresistible crisps to the popular Penang snack.

Another dish hailing from Penang is the Cuttlefish Kang Kong ($8), which is essentially chewy slices of cuttlefish accompanied with fresh kang kong, drizzled with sweet sauce, glittered with heaps of sesame and crushed peanuts.

I am not a fan of oysters, so I wouldn’t comment on the taste of this Oh Chien ($8) aka Fried Oyster Omelette. Because more flour was used to make it, the texture was more springy and chewy compared to our local counterpart. I believe oyster fans will enjoy this, judging from how quickly hubby wiped it off the plate.

Wanton soup ($4.50) for a lighter contrast.  I find it fair enough.

With 26 years of experience and development, Penang Ah Mei Hokkien Prawn Mee ($5.50) exudes a gratifying prawn-y aroma. The secret to its mouth-watering broth lies in the use of fried fresh prawn shells and home-made chilli mix.

You cannot miss the Jalan Alor Hokkien Mee ($6.50), originating from Kuala Lumpur. With a recipe perfected over 30 years, this mouth-watering noodles is infused with fragrant dark soy sauce.

Another highlight of the night was Heun Kee Claypot Chicken Rice with salted fish ($9.50/$15). The first thing that hits you is its aroma. 3 different kinds of rice is used to ensure a soft fluffy texture. Its distinctive traditional taste flavor arises from the unique charcoal employed to heat up the claypots. Lining the claypot, is a layer of irresistible crunchy rice. You can choose  to exclude the salted fish ($8.50/$12), but I recommended trying these delicious morsels soaked in sesame oil with hints of Chinese wine.
We also sampled Penang Assam Laksa, which had a sourish thick and spicy broth, plus crisp and fluffy Roti Canai ($6) , more commonly known as Roti Prata in Singapore A word of caution: be prepared to queue and wait ages for your food. We had to wait for up to 30 mins for some items.
Overall
Food/Drink
Value
Ambience
Service

Singapore Food Guides

What to Eat
There is so much more you can do with crabs than just dousing them in chilli sauce. Singapore has gotten very creative with her crustacean dishes – from green chilli crab and crab cakes to butter crab, bee hoon and dumplings
What to Eat
This Serangoon Gardens food centre may be smaller in size to the average, but the food choices there do not disappoint, especially for the dinner and supper crowd. Here are recommendations on what to eat
What to Drink
The slightly bitter, finely ground powder of processed green tea may be had in cakes, drinks, iced desserts and more. Here are 17 ways to get your matcha fix in Singapore
What to Eat
For adventurous eaters or those who want a change from the usual chicken, beef or pork, there are restaurants and butchers in Singapore that offer unusual, mostly farmed, meats such as turtle, kangaroo, even shark
What to Eat
HungryGoWhere checks into Hotel Clover at Jalan Sultan to eat our way through the food-filled neighbourhood packed with Malay eats, hipster cafes, acclaimed hawkers and trendy bars
What to Eat
April 2015 marks the kick-off of this 12-month-long affordable dining program that pairs renowned visiting chefs with Singapore-based heavyweights. We tell you how stellar six-course meals can all be yours for $100
Critics' Reviews
Eggs. They come in all shapes, sizes, colours and varieties: white, brown, free range, barn-laid, small, large and extra large. Some come with Omega 3, others with selenium and carrot. We makes sense of it all.
What to Eat
Bingsu ice shavings, sweet rice cakes and toasts invade the cafes here. Not typically offered in traditional Korean meals, desserts are served only during special occasions as refreshments, but in Singapore, the tables are turned
What to Drink
Singapore’s Chinatown is spilling over with good food and drinks: from top-notch fine dining to hawker centre stalwarts, cocktails to traditional regional staples. Here’s where to get what