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Teochew Handmade Pau (朝洲自制包点有限公司)

3.8

Eatability rating

20 reviews

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AsianChineseSnacksTeochew
Teochew Handmade Pau sells all kinds of traditional buns which are small in size but yet delightful. The char siew pau is fragrant and contains minced and juicy and tasty char siew. The siew mai is also delicious and meaty. Phone orders at least 1 day in advance.

Tue - Sat: 06:00 - 14:00

Sun: 06:00 - 12:00

Closed: Mon, Alt Tue

+65 62542053
$6 based on 11 submissions
Breakfast (3 votes), Cheap Eat/Budget (3 votes), Vibrant/Noisy (3 votes)
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Long queue for food

The stall specialised in teochew pau. The queue is quite long, and most people has huge orders. For the one standing in front of me, ordered 12 lotus pau and 12 cha siew pau.

Since already wasted so much time queuing up, I end up ordering a piece of every items on the menu for takeaway. Prawn dumpling and cha siew rice is not available. Prices ranges from $0.60 for a pau to $1.20 for a big pau. The pau is very small which be easily finisihed in a couple of mouthfuls.

I like the pau as the skin is very thin, especially the Kou Rou pau which is stuffed with pulled pork. It tastes very juicy and flavourful.

The Siew Mai tastes a bit too oily to me.

The HGW community like this place for...

  • Kong Bah Bao3 votes
  • Char Siew Pau2 votes
  • Da Bao2 votes
  • Lor Mai Kai1 vote
  • Tau Sar pau1 vote
  • char siew pao1 vote
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Latest Community Reviews:
• 14 May 2014 • 63 reviews • 2 followers

Long queue for food

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The stall specialised in teochew pau. The queue is quite long, and most people has huge orders. For the one standing in front of me, ordered 12 lotus pau and 12 cha siew pau.

Since already wasted so much time queuing up, I end up ordering a piece of every items on the menu for takeaway. Prawn dumpling and cha siew rice is not available. Prices ranges from $0.60 for a pau to $1.20 for a big pau. The pau is very small which be easily finisihed in a couple of mouthfuls.

I like the pau as the skin is very thin, especially the Kou Rou pau which is stuffed with pulled pork. It tastes very juicy and flavourful.

The Siew Mai tastes a bit too oily to me.
Overall
Food/Drink
Value
Ambience
Service
• 27 Nov 2012 • 389 reviews • 13 followers

Ok only lah...

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Appearance wise, their mini pau is certainly very cute!! Taste wise, it's only ok leh. 

I tried their chicken pau and its only normal nice. 

Their mini char Siew pau is certainly nicer for the eyes than for the tongue.
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• 09 Feb 2012 • 249 reviews • 549 followers

Tiny Teochew pau that packs a punch!

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So what makes a Teochew pau special? Well, many things it seems! The Teochew ah hia here takes liberties with what we know as ‘pau’ and gives it his own Teochew twist.
Firstly, the paus here are tiny. Why are they tiny? Well, the boss told me that they are small because the skin is very thin. Their philosophy is to make food for enjoyment and not to fill the tummy, it seems. The most popular pau here is the braised pork (kong bak) pau. If you want to eat this pau, you should ring up to reserve for some before you visit the stall because it is usually sold out by noon time. Yes, you might see baskets of it lying around, but they are usually reserved for other customers.
The kong bak pau was tasty, though I found it slightly dry. Rather than having braised pork belly, they use lean meat which is healthier. It was very nice and you can finish it in two mouthfuls. Apparently they are also famous for their char siew pau but I didn't really think much about it. It was good but pretty much like many other char siew pau and lacked a charred flavour. On the other hand, their big pau was good, though not fantastic or super juicy. But it had a very different flavour from the typical big pau and definitely worth trying if you like big pau.
Of all the items I tasted that day, the best one for me was the siew mai. I liked it not because it was the best siew mai I have ever tasted, but for its novelty. The difference lies in the fact that they used fish in place of prawns in the filling and rather than having a bit of crab roe, the orange coating came from carrots. So it was delightful because the taste was unique and yummy.
Other than the char siew pau, all the items here are quite unique to this stall. If you are looking for something novel in a pau, this is the stall to visit.
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