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Review for Woorinara Korean Restaurant

3.5

Eatability rating

24 reviews

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Address: #01-02, 19 Lorong Kilat, 598120
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+65 68846884
15 Oct 2013
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Terrible service

A totally disapointing experience! 

Went there on a public holiday, only to find out that they 'ran out of rice' at around 8.10pm. And instead of cooking more rice, they went round telling existing customers that they're not serving any more rice for the rest of the day! There were customers still walking in at that hour and they can't order rice either. Quite appalling for a restaurant! 

They were also obviously very very shorthanded. Staff were slow and very disorganised. We'd sit there for more than 10 minutes and the staff would be too busy to give us the menu, it took numerous attempts to try to get the staff's attention to take our order, food took very long to arrive at the table and we were told that they ran out of rice AFTER the hotpot arrived at the table. Terrible! Drink we ordered never appeared either. 

Although the food was reasonable for the price, the service was so bad I'll never visit again. A total mood spoiler for the night. Don't take the risk at this restaurant, there are plenty of better restaurants along lorong kilat with faster and better service and much better value for money as well. 

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